Yam Pancakes

I mentioned in  Kitchen: Old and New how much I love cooking, and eating. During highschool I studied in a culinary apprenticeship program - at that time I was certain I wanted to be a chef (at times I have also been "certain" that I wanted to be a surgeon, psychiatrist, model, archeologist, actress, film director, photographer etc). Though pursuing a culinary career is not in my future, I learned a lot in that program. As a child I grew up with two parents who loved to cook and there were very few nights that they weren't home. So we lucked out and had home cooked meals everyday -  however, this meant that I didn't know the first thing about making mashed potatoes, let alone a velouté or béchamel - I had never had to cook for myself. My apprenticeship taught me all of that and more. I learned a dozen ways to cook eggs, how to properly pour a glass of wine, and to love cooking with lots of butter. I think cooking school solidified the fact that I am a meat eater. I couldn't be a vegetarian to save my life. My love of food grew rapidly, and my love was not just for food in general, but for "fancy" food. I craved ornate salads with berries and nuts. I desired rich, creamy sauces garnished with herbs and carved fruit. My love of food presentation grew with my love of quality meals. Arranging a plate was like painting with flavour, texture, and colour; piling vegetables as high as possible was a challenge I delighted in. A plate's shape, the curve of a bowl, the width of a rim: these were all factors that influence the overall look of a plated dish.

I'm no chef, but I believe this part of my life may have been where my love of pottery started - even if I didn't know it then. It was definitely the beginning of my love for food, meal sharing, entertainment, hosting, and cooking.

I'm not a food blogger, but here's my dinner from a few nights ago. We had some leftover yams from yam chips the night before, so I made pancakes. I had never made them before, so I thought I'd share my revelation with you guys.

I used two yams for Jesse and I. It made three pancakes.

1. Grate yams into a bowl 2. Beat two eggs and add. 3. Add spices (in my case paprika, chipotle), salt, pepper, diced onion and garlic. (Again, not a food blogger (or a "recipe" type cook) so use your judgement and taste buds to figure how much you want to add!) 4. Mix with your hands - this is the fun part. 5. Sprinkle in flour little by little until the yam consistency just starts to hold it's shape (like cookie dough... but shredded yams). 6. Heat up coconut oil in a frying pan (Roughly 1/4" - 1/2" deep?) - you can get coconut oil by the tub at a bulk food store, for cheap. 7. When it is HOT, drop in a spoonful of yam mixture and flatten with a spoon. (You should hear crackling when you put the mixture in) 8. Flip over when browned. They are done when both sides start to look pancakey (that speckly brown look, ya know). 9. You can put your pancakes into a warm oven until they are ready to serve on a beautiful plate. Remember, half the taste is in the appearance!

photo(1)I served ours with HIGH-FAT yogurt (don't skimp on the fat, life is short), refried kidney beans, tomatoes, and sweet peppers. You could also use sour cream, salsa, or guacamole. Throw in some cilantro, parsley, and scallions and you've got yourself some Mexican yam pancakes.

I also think they would be delicious with bacon and marmalade for breakfast. With a drizzle of honey and icing sugar.

Here's my pancakes on the first plate I ever bought, made by Michael Connelly. I picked up a set of two from the Artstream Nomadic Gallery at NCECA 2012.

 

Cattle

IMG_1825This week I am in Houston, Texas for NCECA - a massive conference where clay people from all over North America flock to look at work, buy tools and equipment, listen to discussions and lectures and most of all, socialize. This is my second year attending with The Pottery Supply House (my part-time job). We are exhibiting in the resource hall along with dozens of other companies that supply/manufacture kilns, equipment, tools, glazes, literature etc. As enjoyable as a week immersed in clay-related activities and networking is, I was at the point of a nervous breakdown prior to my departure from Canada. The Gardiner show is only three weeks away and I am taking an entire week away from my clay work in order to spend some time in Texas. Bad, bad, bad. So I spent the weekend pumping out dozens of doilies while watching episodes of BBC's Blue Planet and had some much needed outdoor time. We took my parents' dog Bentley (I call him Boo) on a long hike and then went to the beach where he dug big holes in the sand and repeatedly dropped his ball in the lake.

IMG_2040Monday afternoon we were off to Houston! Not only is the temperature significantly warmer, but the immediate arrival of sunshine and plants that are GREEN were extremely comforting. We set aside our winter jackets, boots and wool socks and donned sandals, sunglasses and shorts. It's lovely here in the South.

Houston is a beautiful city! Though this concrete jungle lacks in small pubs and quaint diners, I have rarely been to a city so full of joy - the abundant stretches of lawn, bamboo stalks and palm trees reflect rays of cheer as you walk down the street. Maybe this past winter in Toronto has felt particularly long - I have never enjoyed hot, humid air so much.

IMG_1922Yesterday we went to the NCECA Biennial and the NCECA National Student Juried Exhibition as well as several other small shows in Houston's Museum District. Though not impressed overall with the work at the Biennial, the Student Exhibition was quite delightful and had many lovely pieces that provoked wonder, thought and concern. Some of my favourites belonged to Shasta Krueger and Heather Davis.

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Today after 8 hours selling at our booth, my colleague Becky and I went to Santa Fe Clay: La Mesa, where 150 potters had work set out on long tables for the public to peruse and purchase. Unfortunately all of the pieces I wanted to purchase had already been donned with little red dots - somebody else had got there first.

Thankfully, NCECA has no shortage of pots. I went up to the Gallery Expo and bought myself a plate by Ron Meyers. I've always admired his work and came very close to buying a piece of his last year, when again, I was thwarted by that red dot. So on Tuesday when we arrived I started scoping out for his pieces and found several galleries at the Expo that showed his work. I had been eyeing this plate ever since and finally mustered up the courage to add it to my collection. My wallet is hurting, but I'm not - this may have been the best purchase I've ever made.

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